Fall Leaves Shawl Pattern and Recipe

This is a recipe to create a rectangular shawl in either medium or DK weight yarn. It’s a beautiful pattern that’s great for beginners and experienced knitters alike. The lace pattern is a variation on the very popular February Lady Sweater, and reminds me of fall leaves. This is a recipe more than a pattern because it gives you a formula to design your own shawl, although there’s also an option to simply follow the pattern I’ve provided in the Instructions section below. You can download a PDF of the pattern using the link at the bottom of the page, and knit along with the video tutorial to learn how to knit the lace pattern while knitting a swatch. You might also want to check out this lesson, which demonstrates how to do all the skills necessary to knit the beautiful Fall Leaves Shawl.

Materials: 

You’ll need the following materials:

  • Yarn in either a solid or semi-solid color; the beautiful lace pattern would likely disappear with a full variegated colorway. You will need 600-800 yards of a medium (worsted or aran) weight yarn or 800-1000 yards of a DK weight yarn depending on how big you want to make your shawl. Rectangular shawls are often 15-18” wide and 60-70” long. 
  • 24” circular needles in the size that allows your lace to drape the way you like. (Note gauge is not important but drape is; see the section below on Customizing Your Shawl.) I suggest starting with the needle size recommended with the yarn you choose, or size US 8 for medium yarn and size US 6 for DK. 
  • I also suggest needles 1mm larger than the size you use for the main body of the shawl for both for the cast on and bind off.
  • 12 or so stitch markers to place between each repeat of the lace pattern.

Abbreviation/Terms:

You can find demonstration videos for how to do each of the following and more in Beginning Knitting Lesson 8:

  • K: Knit
  • P: Purl
  • K2tog: Knit 2 together – insert the right needle into the first two stitches on the left needle (knitwise like usual) and knit them at the same time
  • PM: Place marker 
  • SSK: Slip slip knit – slip the first stitch on the left needle to the right needle, knitwise, repeat with the second stitch, insert the left needle into the front loops of the two slipped stitches and knit together
  • Sts: Stitches 
  • YO: Yarn over

Lace Pattern:

The lace pattern is worked over 7 stitches and 4 rows as follows:

  • Row 1: K1, K2tog, YO, K1, YO, SSK, K1
  • Row 2: P
  • Row 3: K2tog, YO, K3, YO, SSK
  • Row 4: P

Using the Stitch Markers:

After you finish the garter stitch border, all rows of this shawl start with a section of garter stitch (knit on both the right side and wrong side of the shawl), followed by several repeats of the lace pattern, and end with a section of garter stitch. I place stitch markers in between each of these sections (including between each repeat of the lace pattern), which I find helps me make sure I didn’t miss a stitch or make a mistake in my lace before continuing to the next repeat. 

Customizing Your Shawl:

I suggest starting by knitting a swatch in the lace pattern to make sure the fabric is flowing like you want. Start with the size needle recommended for your yarn, or size US 8 for medium yarn and size US 6 for DK weight. Knit the following swatch:

  • Cast on 27 stitches (for either weight yarn); I used the long-tail cast on.
  • Knit 1 row.
  • For every subsequent row, K3, repeat the lace pattern for that row 3 times, K3.
  • Repeat the 4 rows of the lace pattern 6-8 times until you have enough of a swatch to be able to feel the drape.

You can knit along with the following video, which starts after you’ve cast on your stitches and knit one row:

After you finish your swatch, if the fabric feels too stiff, try a larger needle size. If you’re having a hard time seeing the pattern or it feels like it’s all lace and no structure, try a smaller needle size. You might also consider blocking your swatch before you make a final decision – the lace pattern does open up a little when it’s blocked.  

I also suggest measuring the width of your lace repeat so you can calculate how many repeats you want to do to create the width of the shawl you want. Rectangular shawls are often 15-18” wide; you can decide how wide you would like yours to be. I have assumed a 1” border on each side, although if you choose a wider shawl, you may want to increase the width of the border to 1.5” or even 2”. (The border width on the shawl in the photo above is 2” knit with medium weight yarn.) Once you know how wide your lace repeat is and how wide you want your shawl to be, you can calculate how many lace repeats to do.

For example, if my lace is 1.56” wide and I want a shawl that’s approximately 16” wide, I could do the following calculation:

  • 16” goal-width for my shawl less 2 borders (1” each) is 14”.
  • 14” wide section of the lace panel for my shawl (my target) divided by 1.56” (the width of my lace pattern) is 8.97, which I will round to 9 repeats.
  • To check my math, I would take 9 repeats of the lace pattern times 1.56” (the width of 1 section of lace) and get 14.04”, then add 2” for the border and get 16”. Total my shawl would be just over 16” wide. 

The next step is to calculate how many stitches to cast on, using the following formulas: 

  • Medium weight yarn: Take 7 stitches times the number of lace repeats you plan to knit, then add 10 stitches (5 for each 1” border). 
  • DK weight yarn: Take 7 stitches times the number of lace repeats you plan to knit, then add 12 stitches (6 for each 1” border).

Remember to increase the number of border stitches if you plan to have a wider border.

Using my example above with the 16” shawl, 7 stitches times 9 repeats is 63 stitches plus 10 stitches for the borders means I would cast on 73 stitches.

Instructions:

Feel free to substitute your own number of lace repeats, border width, and cast on stitches using the calculations above. The pattern below uses the following:

  • 1” border on each side (5 sts wide for medium weight yarn and 6 for DK.)
  • For medium weight yarn, 9 lace repeats with a gauge of 1.56” per repeat; 16” wide shawl.
  • For DK weight yarn, 11 lace repeats with a gauge of 1.24”per repeat; 15.5” wide shawl.

The shawl is knit flat, so you turn the work after every row.

Cast on:

Using the larger needle size and the long tail cast on method, cast on 73 stitches for medium yarn or 89 for DK yarn. 

First border:

Knit every row for 1” (count the number of rows as you go so you can knit the same number on the final border.)

Lace section:

Start the lace section as follows:

  • Medium yarn: K5, PM, knit 9 sections of lace placing a marker after each section, K5
  • DK yarn: K6, PM, knit 11 sections of lace placing a marker after each section, K6

Continue through all the rows of the lace pattern, repeating those rows until the shawl is 1” shorter than your desired length. A common length for rectangular shawls is 60-70”.

Final border:

Knit every row for 1” (or the same number of rows as your first border.)

Bind off:

Use the larger needles to bind off using the traditional bind off method.

Finishing:

Sew in ends and block your shawl to help open up the lace pattern.

Download the Pattern:

Down the free pattern for the Fall Leaves Shawl:

Lesson 7 – Mitten Ornament

In this lesson, you’ll learn how to knit the Mitten Ornament, which comes together quickly and is adorable when hanging on the Christmas tree. The pattern also provides a chance to practice the M1L and M1R stitches and the mattress stitch. You knit it flat, and then use the mattress stitch to sew the sides together.

You’ll need the following supplies:

  • A small amount (less than 1 ounce) of worsted weight (medium) yarn; I used Vanna’s Choice,
  • US size 3 and 5 needles; DPNS, circulars, or straight needles should all work,
  • Crochet hook (size G or something similar),
  • Darning needle, and
  • Scissors.

Start by downloading or printing the Mitten Ornament pattern, and then review each of the following:

Feel free to post a question in the comment section or drop me an email. Happy knitting!

Ready for more practice?

This Christmas Bell Ornament is also very cute and comes together quickly. Or check out all the available beginner knitting lessons.

Mitten Ornament Pattern and Video

This cute mitten ornament is a quick knit Christmas ornament that makes a great gift. It’s knit flat and then sewn together using the mattress stitch. Download the pattern and watch a video tutorial below. You might also want to check out this lesson to learn all the skills necessary for knitting the mitten ornament.

 Materials: 

  • A small amount (less than 1 ounce) of worsted weight (medium) yarn; I used Vanna’s Choice.
  • US size 3 and 5 needles; DPNS, circulars, or straight needles should all work
  • Crochet hook (size G or something similar)
  • Darning needle 
  • Scissors 

My gauge was 5 stitches per inch, although exact gauge is not critical.

Abbreviation/Terms:

  • K: Knit
  • P: Purl
  • M1L: Make One Left (Use the left needle to pick up the bar in between the first stitch on each needle; for M1L, pick up the bar from the front and knit into the back of the stitch.)
  • M1R: Make One Right (Use the left needle to pick up the bar in between the first stitch on each needle; for M1R, pick up the bar from the back and knit into the front of the stitch.)
  • K2tog: Knit 2 Together
  • Sts: Stitches 

Instructions:

The pattern starts at the cuff and is knit flat.  Turn after every row. 

Cast On: Using size 3 needles, cast on 24 sts using the Long-Tail Cast On method.

Rows 1 – 6: K1, P1, repeat across the row (24 sts.)

Row 7: Switch to size 5 needles and purl across the row.

Row 8: K11, M1L, K2, M1R, K11 (26 sts).

Row 9: Purl.

Row 10: K11, M1L, K4, M1R, K11 (28 sts).

Row 11: Purl.

Row 12: K11, M1L, K6, M1R, K11 (30 sts).

Row 13: P18. There will be 12 stitches remaining on the left needle.  Turn your work.

Row 14: K6. There will be 12 stitches remaining on the left needle.  Turn your work.

Row 15: P6. Turn.

Row 16: K2tog three times. 

Cut the yarn leaving a 12” tail.  Using a darning needle, thread the tail yarn through the three stitches you knit on Row 16.

Holding the work with the wrong side facing you, you should have 12 stitches on each needle.  Reattach the yarn and purl across the 12 stitches on the left needle, completing the row.  

Row 17: Knit (24 sts.)

Row 18: Purl.

Row 19: Knit. 

Row 20: Purl.

Row 21: K2tog, K1, repeat across the row (16 sts.)

Row 22: Purl.

Row 23: K2tog across the row (8 sts.)

Cut the yarn leaving a 24” tail. Using a darning needle, thread the tail yarn through the live stitches on your needle to bind off. Pull tight to cinch closed the top of the mitten. Use the mattress stitch to sew closed the side of the mitten.

When you get to the end of the cuff, tie a knot using the sewing yarn and cast on tail. Crochet a chain 4” long and attach at the end.  Weave in both ends.    

Also use the mattress stitch to close the thumb, being sure to also close up the hole at the base of the thumb.

Download a PDF of the Pattern:

Video Tutorial:

The following video provides step-by-step instructions for knitting the mitten ornament:

How to Sew the Mattress Stitch

The mattress stitch is one of many techniques for joining two pieces of knitting in a way that’s often nearly invisible. You start by finding the bar that’s between the stitches just past the first row of stitches at the edge. You can see the bars in the image below:

Then with the two pieces of work side you’re joining held by side, use the yarn with a sewing needle to go down behind the bar on the left piece of knitting, then down behind the bar on the right piece of knitting. After going back and forth, you’ll see the zig zags across the gap as shown below:

Then when you pull yarn tight, the stitches disappear and the result is a beautiful seam!

Video Tutorial

The following video shows you all the steps of sewing the mattress stitch:

Want to Give it a Try?

This mitten ornament is sewn shut with the mattress stitch.

How to Knit the M1L and M1R Increases

Make 1 Left (M1L) and Make 1 Right (M1R) are common increase stitches. M1L leans to the left and M1R leans to the right; you can see how the left side of the swatch above (where I did several M1Ls) leans to the left, and the right side (where I did several M1Rs) leans to the right. If a pattern just includes an M1 (without indicating Left or Right), you can choose which to do; you might want to think about the direction you want the stitch to lean. If your’e doing several increases and they don’t need to go a specific direction, such as on a hat where you increase every 10 stitches all the way around, you might want to choose one and do it consistently. Here’s how to do M1L and M1R:

Pick up the Bar Between the Stitches with the Left Needle

For both M1L and M1R, use your left needle to pick up the bar between the stitches where you want to make the increase. The arrow below is pointing toward the bar.

Bar between the stitches

Make 1 Left

For M1L, use the left needle to pick up the bar from the front, then knit through the back loop.

Make 1 Right

For M1R, use the left needle to pick up the bar from the back, then knit through the front loop.

Make 1 Right

Video Tutorial

The following video tutorial demonstrates how to knit the M1L and M1R increases.

Want to Give it a Try?

This cute mitten ornament is a great way to practice the M1L and M1R increases.

How to Try On a WIP Garment

One of the benefits of hand knitting is you can make everything to fit! In addition to knitting a gauge swatch, one of the best ways to make sure a work-in-progress (WIP) garment is going to fit how you want is to try it on as you go. If you’re knitting with circular needles but they aren’t long enough to try the piece on without losing stitches, you can add a cable extender and a second cable just to try it on, then remove the extra cable if necessary to continue knitting. If you’re using the magic loop method (either traditional or with two circular needles) you may be able to leave them long. It’s very important to regularly check the fit on a large project such as a top-down sweater, but also important for hats, cowls, socks, etc.

Using the Traveller’s Cowl as a demonstration, the following video shows how to add the extra length of cable to be able to try on your project:

Intermediate Lesson – Stranded Colorwork

Stranded color work is when you hold multiple colors of yarn (most often two at a time) and follow a chart to make designs in your knitting. One of most commonly-cited examples is fair isle knitting. The sample above is stranded color work, as is this sheep hat. This lesson provides the information you need to get started with stranded color work, as well as the pattern for the sample swatch shown above that you can try.

Holding Yarn in Both Hands

I think the easiest way to knit in colorwork is to hold one color of yarn in each hand, as show in the image below:

Example of knitting stranded colorwork while holding one color of yarn in each hand

To learn to hold a color in each hand means first learning to knit both ways – Continental (yarn held in the left hand) and English (yarn held in the right hand.) Most of my Cushion of Joy lessons demonstrate how to knit Continental; this post is a lesson with all the steps to learn how to knit English. Before attempting colorwork, I suggest doing a significant amount of practice with knitting, purling, and then rib stitch, and ideally knitting an entire project with your non-dominant style. Then come back here for the next steps.

Color Theory, Yarn Selection, and Yarn Dominance

There are three things for us to discuss about color: your choice of colors, your choice of yarns, and which color will be dominant based on how you hold your yarn. Paying attention to all three of these before you start will help you achieve a beautiful and even result.

  • Choice of Colors: You want to make sure your colors have an appropriate contrast. One suggest is to hold the skeins together and squint at them – if they blend together, there probably isn’t enough contrast for your colorwork to really stand out well.
  • Choice of Yarns: It’s also important to choose colors in the exact same yarn. If one yarn is even slightly smaller, that color can start to disappear in the piece and it will be hard to make your stitches even.
  • Yarn Dominance: Finally, there will be one color you want to stand out more in your piece (to be dominant) and one that serves more as a background color. In my swatch above, white is the background color and blue is the dominant color. You want to hold the dominant color in your left hand.

Knitting Your Pattern

Colorwork is often knit in the round (a hat, scarf, mittens, etc.) because the back isn’t really good for sharing with the world. For example, you would only see colorwork on a scarf that’s knit in a tube, not one where the back could show. The following is an example of the back side of my colorwork swatch; you can see all the floats.

Back side of colorwork swatch

The good news is that means colorwork is almost all knit stitches (not often purl.) To make the design, you simply follow the chart and knit the number of stitches shown for each color. When reading the chart, start at the bottom right corner. In the following example, row 2 is all white; in row 2 you would knit 1 blue stitch, 2 white, 1 blue, 2 white, 3 blue, etc. The video below gives a good demonstration of how to do this.

Sample colorwork chart

You need to note how many times the pattern repeats; that will be stated in the pattern. I often place a stitch marker in between each repeat so I make sure I’m in the right place in the pattern. For example the pattern above repeats every 8 stitches so I might have placed stitch markers after rows 8, 16, 24, etc. I could check to make sure my work in those sections matched, or I would know right away that I needed to make a correction. You can see a example of this in the colorwork for the Buckbeak Pullover as shown in my video discussing the use of stitch markers.

The Knit Companion app is great for colorwork. As shown below, you can use the blue vertical bar to mark where you are in the repeating pattern, and use the yellow horizontal bar to highlight the row you’re knitting. That way you can avoid losing your place. You can download the swatch pattern PDF then import it into your Knit Companion app. I find it’s a little easier to see on a tablet (like an iPad) than a cell phone.

Screenshot of Knit Companion app

Final Tips and Tricks

The following are a few final tips before you dive in and knit your first practice swatch:

  • Larger Knitting Needles: Your tension is likely to be a little tighter during colorwork than during regular stockinette knitting, so it’s recommended to go up a needle size or two on the first row where the colorwork starts. I recently knit gauge swatches for a sweater that included both plain stockinette and a significant section of colorwork; in order to get the gauge to match between the two, I had to go up two needle sizes for the colorwork section (from US size 4 to 6 for DK yarn.)
  • Stay Loose: Building on the previous point, it’s also important to make sure you’re frequently moving your stitches along the right needle – best practice is every 3 to 5 stitches. If your tension is too tight, the fabric will pucker, sometimes too much to block out. Make sure you’ve left enough slack since the last stitch in a particular color before you knit with it again.
  • Carry Your Floats: The float is the part where the the yarn goes along the back of the work before you need to knit with that color again. Best practice is to not go more than 4 or 5 stitches without anchoring the floating color by twisting that yarn around the other color. The practice swatch is designed to let you practice this technique in row 12. You’ll notice there are 7 white stitches in a row. You would knit 3 or 4, then twist the yarn balls, then continue for the rest of the white stitches. This is demonstrated in the video below.

Demonstration

The following video shows how to knit the colorwork sample swatch and provides several tips for success:

Ready to Give it a Try?

The following are links to the sample swatch pattern for practice and the sheep hat, which is a great first stranded colorwork project:

Feel free to post a question in the comment section or drop me an email. Happy knitting!

Ready for more practice?

In addition to the sheep hat, you might like the matching mittens and cowl or this reindeer hat. Or check out the other available Cushion of Joy knitting lessons.

How to Knit the Circular Tubular Cast on for 2×2 Rib

The circular tubular cast on is very stretchy, beautiful, and invisible. It’s great for a hat, fingerless gloves, or other projects that begin with 2×2 rib. The steps are different than the circular tubular cast on for 1×1 rib, although those instructions are also available on the site. While there are several steps involved, they’re not difficult and I think they’re worth it for the result.

You will need the following supplies:

  • Your project yarn;
  • Your project knitting needles (in my example I’m using a long circular needle to do magic loop); use the needle size needed for the 2×2 rib section of your pattern;
  • Another circular needle that can be shorter in length but needs to be at least as long as the circumference of your project. Ideally it would have the same size needles as your long circular needle, but if you don’t have another set they can be one size smaller;
  • Scissors;
  • A small amount of smooth scrap yarn in a contrasting color;
  • A crochet hook (any size will work; if you don’t have one, I suggest size G); and
  • One stitch marker.

The following are the steps, which are demonstrated in the video below:

  • Provisional Cast On: Tie a knot at the end of your scrap yarn, then an inch or so above that tie a slip knot and place it over the crochet hook. Chain a few stitches. Using the short circular needles (not the ones you will ultimately use for your project), cast on half as many stitches as called for in your pattern, then chain a few stitches, cut the yarn and loosely pull through the last loop.
  • Four Rows of Stockinette: Slide your provisional stitches to the other end of the circular needles so you will be ready to knit into the end with the knot. Using your project knitting needles and project yarn, knit across the provisional cast on stitches. At the end of the row, turn your work (do not yet join in the round) and purl across. Repeat another knit row, and then another purl row. At this point you will have your provisional cast on following by four rows of stockinette; your live stitches are on the knitting needles you plan to use for your project.
  • Set Up Row: Using the smaller circular needles, pick up the stitches from the provisional cast on and remove your scrap yarn. Hold the two needles (with the knitting in between them) in your left hand with the tips of the needles to the right and the purl stitches facing up; fold the knitting in half so the purl stitches get tucked into the middle and the two knitting needles are held together. Using the other end of your project needles, two stitches off the front needle, then move the yarn to the front and purl two stitches from the back needle. This is setting up the 2×2 rib. Continue until all stitches are picked up. (This is why you cast on half as many stitches as you needed.) You should end with two purl stitches.
  • Join in the Round: This is when you place a stitch marker and join in the round.
  • Continue with 2×2 Rib: Knitting in the round, you are now starting row three on your pattern of 2×2 rib and you’re ready to knit two stitches, then purl two. Even though you’ve knit more than two rows, all of the steps above result in two rows of 2×2 rib and you’re therefore ready here for row three.

The following video shows how to do every step of the circular tubular cast on for 2×2 rib:

Want to Give it a Try?

The following projects work well with the circular tubular cast on for 2×2 rib:

How to do the Tubular Bind Off for 1×1 Rib

This tubular bind off is a beautiful and very stretchy bind off that’s great whenever the end of your project is 1×1 rib. I demonstrate how to do this with the Traveller’s Cowl, which I started with the Circular Tubular Cast On and ended with this Tubular Bind Off. This bind off is done with a sewing needle and 5 steps that you repeat until all stitches are bound off. The following are the steps, which you can see demonstrated in the video below.

Setting Up

To get started, you need to break your working yarn from the skein. First, measure a length of yarn that’s four times the circumference of your project. Cut the yarn and thread into a sewing needle.  

Step 1

Insert the needle knit wise into the first stitch.  Pull through, then slip that stitch off the end of the knitting needle. 

Step 2

Insert the needle purl wise into the second stitch from the tip.  Be careful not to pull it too tight. 

Step 3

Insert the needle purl wise into the stitch at the tip, then slip that stitch of the end of the knitting needle.

Step 4

From the back, insert the needle in the space between the first two stitches and pull the needle to the front of the work.

Step 5

Insert the needle knit wise into the second stitch from the tip and pull it all the way through to the back.  

Repeat

Repeat these steps until all the stitches have been bound off. 

Video Demonstration

The following video shows you how to do all the steps for the Tubular Bind Off for 1×1 Rib.

Want to Give it a Try?

The following is a great pattern to try the tubular bind off. 

Traveller’s Cowl Pattern

I designed the Traveller’s Cowl to coordinate with the Traveller’s Hat pattern by Sue Jackson.  This advanced beginner project is quick, easy, and turns out great. It works well with stripes, as shown here, or would be equally nice in a single color of yarn, either solid or verigated. I used Madison, an aran weight yarn by Miss Babs, although any medium weight yarn would work.  

Traveller’s Cowl
Traveller’s Hat and Cowl

Pattern

The following is the pattern for the Traveler’s Cowl, or you can download a free PDF below:

 Materials: 

  • Aran or worsted weight yarn, approximately 150 yards; to make the stripes, get 75 yards of each color. 
  • US Size 3 and Size 6 needles (you could just use size 6); I used 16” circular needles, or you could use magic loop
  • A straight needle in a much larger size (I used size 10)
  • A crochet hook (I used size G)
  • Some smooth scrap yarn
  • A stitch marker 

Gauge and Finished Measurements: 

My gauge in the patten (row of K1, P1, row of knit) is 18.5 stitches in 4”.  Gauge doesn’t have to be exact.  

The cowl is designed to be worn by an adult.  My finished project in 6.75” tall and 10” in diameter (not circumference.) 

Instructions:

These instructions start with the circular tubular cast on for 1×1 rib.  You can substitute a different cast on and 2 rows of 1×1 rib if you prefer, then pick up the pattern at row 5 below.  An instructional video for how to do this beautiful and stretchy cast on is available at https://wordpress.com/block-editor/post/cushionofjoy.com/1450

Cast On and First Stripe:

  • Provisional Cast On: Tie a knot at the end of your scrap yarn, then an inch or so above that tie a slip knot and place it over the crochet hook. Chain a few stitches. Using the knitting needle that’s several sizes larger than your project needle and the provisional cast on method, cast on 44 provisional cast on stitches, chain a few stitches, cut the yarn and loosely pull through the last loop.  
  • Set Up Row: Using the color of yarn you want at the top of your cowl (for under your chin) and the size 3 needles, *K1, yarn over,* repeat all the way across. As you transition from the set up row to row 1, you’ll need to join the project into a loop. Remember to make sure your stitches aren’t twisted, do the final yarn over, add the stitch marker, then knit the first stitch of row 1. Make sure you have a total of 88 stitches and yarn overs (44 of each.)  Note I used size 3 needles here to help make the top of the cowl a little smaller.  To make it even all the way up and down, you could use size 6 needles for all the steps (or whatever size needle you need to achieve the approximate gauge.)
  • Row 1: K1, move the yarn to the front and slip one (insert the right needle into the first stitch on the left needle as if to purl and slide over to the right needle.) In other words, you’ll knit every stitch you knit in the previous row and slip every yarn over (remembering to hold the yarn in the front.) Repeat all the way across.
  • Row 2: Move the yarn to the back and slip one (insert the right needle into the first stitch on the left needle as if to purl and slide over to the right needle), then move the yarn to the front and purl the next stitch. Repeat all the way across. You will be slipping the stitches you knit in Row 1 and purling the stitches you had previously slipped.
  • Row 3: Repeat Row 1.
  • Row 4: Repeat Row 2. 
  • Remove the Scrap Yarn: Start with the tail end that does not have a knot at the very end. Untie the knot at the first chain and pull gently until you can remove all the scrap yarn.  At the other end, you may need to untie the first slip knot and then pull the yarn completely from your work.  
  • Row 5: Switch to the size 6 needles.  *K1, P1* all the way across.  
  • Row 6: Knit
  • Rows 7-10: Repeatrows 5 and 6 two more times. 
  • Row 11: *K1, P1* all the way across 

Stripe:

  • Row 1: Switch to next color.  Knit around 
  • Row 2: Slip the first stitch to create a joyless join, P1, then *K1, P1* the rest of the row
  • Row 3: Knit
  • Row 4: *K1, P1* across 
  • Rows 5-8: Repeat rows 3 and 4 two more times. 

Completing the Cowl:

  • Knit four more stripes as directed above (for a total of six stripes.) 
  • Bind off using the tubular bind off.  
  • Weave in ends and block if desired. 

Pattern Download

The following is the free pattern you can download:

Video Tutorials

The following videos may be helpful when knitting this cowl:

Want to Knit the Matching Hat?